Saturday, June 7, 2008

San Francisco Celebrates June 8 World Ocean Day at Ocean Beach


Mayor Declares June 8 as World Ocean Day in San Francisco

Volunteers Celebrate with Beach Cleanup at Ocean Beach

For Immediate Release

Contact: Eli Saddler, Director of OceanHealth.Org, cell 415-342-7497, eli@oceanhealth.org

What: June 8 is World Ocean Day and hundreds of volunteers will be heading to Ocean Beach to clean the beach in celebration of our oceans.

Who: OceanHealth.Org (http://www.oceanhealth.org) and the San Francisco Chapter of the Surfrider Foundation (http://www.sfsurfrider.org).

When: Sunday, June 8, 2008, 10AM to 12PM Ocean Beach cleanup.

Where: Santiago St. and Great Highway, San Francisco, CA 94116

Why: Mayor Gavin Newsom issued a proclamation declaring June 8th as “World Ocean Day” in San Francisco. This is the second annual event of OceanHealth.Org and Surfrider in San Francisco (http://www.oceandaysf.org).

Our world ocean covers approximately 71 percent of the Earth’s surface, contains 97 percent of the Earth’s water, and represents 95 percent of the livable space on our planet, but is facing an incredible crisis that needs attention. Oil spills, plastic marine debris, overfishing, and global climate change are culminating in increasing problems for our oceans. In 2048, some scientists predict that important commercial fisheries will begin to collapse. The public is encouraged to learn more and take action for the oceans.

In 2007, the importance of our ocean was highlighted when thousands of volunteers responded to the Cosco Busan oil spill. In that spirit, volunteers will be on the beaches and removing trash that kills wildlife and is contributing to Texas-sized island of marine debris in the Pacific Ocean.

"World Ocean Day" was first proposed in 1992 at the Earth Summit of the United Nations in Rio de Janeiro as an annual opportunity to celebrate our oceans, their importance to humanity, and the need for marine conservation.

Five Actions for the Oceans:

1. Learn more about our world ocean crisis.

2. Reduce or eliminate your use of plastic, especially plastic bags.

3. Reduce or eliminate your consumption of harmful seafood, including tuna, swordfish, shark, and shrimp. You’ll help the oceans and your health.

4. Reduce your greenhouse gases: Drive less and using bikes, buses, or BART more. Replace light bulbs and appliances with energy efficient ones.

5. Show your appreciation for the ocean by keeping it clean and visiting often.

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